Page 30

Facilities Management Journal July 2014

FOCUS BRANDING change and a step-change in the service 9 = communication behind the brand was as U= was launched internally two days before the public launch with a series of roadshows 4 was for that reason there was a big-bang approach to the launch and not a phased introduction of the new brand. Employees were handed their new branded uniforms and vehicles on 25 September in preparation for the public launch on the 26th, and the signage at 14Forty’s Northampton HQ was changed on the evening of the 25th, although signage at client sites was done gradually to / %8 to feel part of the new team immediately, to have that new identity, new culture, new way of doing things and sense of belonging. I wanted everyone to come into work on the 26th with their new uniform and feel proud.” But that big bang approach is not without its challenges. Davies describes the logistical issues in rebranding 6,500 security guard uniforms and issuing the right sizes to the right locations on time, together with rebranding all the vehicles with the new livery, as presenting its own unique challenges. He acknowledges that given his time again, he would include more time in * V "" X A UNIFORM APPROACH While many FM service providers have 9 9 markets, several choose to use the same brand. Servest Group has made a number of acquisitions over the past few years including / >" ="6\ ^ (_ Q` Q (" " >(# ` Support Services in October 2011. The facilities management provider decided to rebrand each of these acquisitions " “The main reason we did this is so that the acquired company feels part of a group, and not a separate entity. There’s a big 9 _Q` and working for Servest Catering,” says 4 " development, Servest Group. Sugars describes how in a previous role, a cleaning company that was acquired by a culture and the business grew independently. “When it was brought into the parent, all hell broke lose, as they didn’t feel part of the group and didn’t understand the culture and values.” 30 JULY 2014 Sugars believes that a large part of a brand is emotional. He describes how the owners of the companies Servest acquired the brand, but that was more about them, 9' the brand, rather than any material concern %4 * that their service will stay the same, and the people will stay the same, that’s what they worry about, not the colour of the logo.” In fact one of the vendors said in hindsight that the business should have been switched to Servest the day of the acquisition, rather quicker integration of culture, attitudes and thinking. = jx 9 " " / * a universal image in all markets. “Clients want to work with a strong brand, where they know who we are, what we do and what we stand for. Having a consistent brand in all markets, and across 80 countries, helps us get that message through.” It also helps if the FM company’s name is known to the building’s end-users as there will be a sense of reassurance that the organisation has # / says, with one brand identity to manage. Y*" " | " There are also internal advantages to having the same brand in all markets, he %8^} 9 ~U} globally making us the 18th biggest employer in the world. Getting our message and identity down to the teams on the ground, so they feel part of one team, is really important. One brand makes that much easier.” NEW START Sometimes a change of brand is forced upon € " \ Orbis, following an attempt by its competitor €j"x ~ * | " \ \ # new owners worked with the Competition ` " \ independent, but VPS did not sell the rights " was inevitable. Orbis, which was chosen by the company’s employees, maintains a link with the organisation’s heritage, and the logo has a similar format and colours to its predecessor making it instantly recognisable. It has 9 " 9 approach to securing and managing vacant properties. “Orbis is a name familiar to colleagues and customers alike but at the same time heralds a new era in the evolution of the business” says CEO Guy Other. \ & * <4 ^ => 4<>+ " 6 !"6jj = > ! ‚5*‚ a company formed by private equity to 9 | # wanted to communicate the new direction of the business both internally and to the market, and they also wanted a brand name that they felt connection with, hence the Bellrock name. Like Compass and Mitie, Bellrock worked with a design agency to help it with its thinking and for the creative input as to how the brand would be represented. “We held a number of workshops which the agency facilitated to help us think about a name that had real meaning. Bellrock was / # / 9 " team of indomitable engineers who were determined to challenge convention and create an innovative solution gave us a narrative for the vision for our business,” says Martin Holt, CEO, Bellrock Property and Facilities Management. Despite the focus on brand by many of the organisations, in many instances the ' 9 Or when it does, it will be alongside the ' 4U= '" Q * 9 and cash spent on branding, for clients it’s the service delivery that matters, not the name and logo. “The 14Forty name is a conversation starter as people want to know what it means. When we talk about it being the minutes in a day, it gives us an opportunity to talk about our vision.” Debra Ward concurs. “Lipstick and makeup get you though the door, but it’s not going to win you the long term contract.” Watch the story of the Mitie rebrand: http://tinyurl.com/nput73t


Facilities Management Journal July 2014
To see the actual publication please follow the link above