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Facilities Management Journal July 2014

16-18 June ExCeL London A5 U> D& @ " ?/ < / GO6Q #UD&@ #< & X/U see what the facilities management Y Alongside the multitude of stands there was a plethora of guest speakers, lectures and seminars. New BIFM chair, Julie Kortens, opened the event on Tuesday 17th of July, and also went on to take part in a question and answer session with deputy chair, Liz Kentish, later that day. winner of the 2013 Young Manager of the Year Award, corralled past winners to give advice to the rising stars of the industry in one of the highlight seminars of the three days. Applications for the 2014 award closed at the end of June. Then, of course, there was the FMJ debate… Are the prevalence of zero hours contracts and the lack of a wider adoption of the Living Wage damaging the reputation and professionalism of the facilities management sector? That was the question discussed by a panel of experts at this year’s FMJ debate, held 8 JULY 2014 and sponsored by Moneypenny. Before diving into the heat of the debate properly, debate chair, Cathy Hayward, asked the audience to demonstrate, through a show of hands, their view on the question. Around a third agreed that the prevalence of zero hours contracts and the lack of a wider adoption of the Living Wage was damaging the sector, but another third disagreed and felt that it wasn’t. The rest were sat, wavering on the fence. Proceedings kicked of with opening remarks by each of the panelists: Guy !"#$ $$% at the Living Wage Foundation, C-J $ "& "'!()*+/ && believes that the Living Wage is a way of making the FM sector more sustainable, % && employees with higher job satisfaction. 9#& clients and service providers. Zero hours &% '/9 &;< $/ & the prevalence of exclusivity clauses in contracts, was a big concern. + $& was representing the Living Wage Foundation, Reilly was supportive of the =&>/$'$ to see it introduced across the sector but said “before this can happen, we need more leadership”. Howden echoed the positive views of the Living Wage that had already been expressed, but went into more detail when she started on zero hours contracts. “If they are not used appropriately,” she explained, “they can damage the industry. Flexibility can be a great thing, especially when you take seasonal variation into account, but exclusivity clauses are a concern.” '& already damaging to the FM industry. “We as an industry need to stand up and perhaps ban exclusivity clauses in @ /*#D < & &% proper contracts.” Hayward then opened questions up ; a range of queries. Talking again & explained how “paying employees properly motivates them, keeps them happy and boosts morale”. He informed the audience that 10 9(EOO#$=& Wage employers, with that number set to grow. Asked about some universities habit of paying only direct employees the Living Wage % Reilly said this was wrong. Q!#$S $ that accreditation by the Living Wage Foundation requires them to $=&>% just direct employees. We look to those institutions that are paying everyone an amount they can live %'# responsible management.” The issue was soon raised of why the Living Wage is required, when we already have a minimum wage. Howden ' # need to move closer and closer together until the lower can be dispensed with. <$% between the methods of calculating the rates, with the wider economic implications of the minimum wage and %U* / # Chancellor “wants a minimum wage starting with a seven… so the numbers may move closer.” Hayward then asked the panellists what, other than the removal of exclusivity clauses, could be done to make zero hours contracts more $/&# issues lie in retail, not FM, with “lazy HR” to blame for workers getting zero hours contracts when they work four-day weeks. '<$#% needed to be expended explaining the & side of the same coin, claiming the most important thing was to assuage the fear employees have that they can work for #$ &'%/V like that. SXO# brought things to a close with a second poll, producing exactly the same result $ three thirds. But, regardless of whether anyone’s views changed, certainly the audience departed entertained and provoked. INDUSTRY INSIGHT FMJ.CO.UK


Facilities Management Journal July 2014
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